Quoteworthy
Learning is continuous. While right after training, everyone may be very aware of what they are doing and very careful to do it correctly, as time passes we become more comfortable. We might forget what we’ve learned. New challenges may change what we do.
Luca Boi

Most Recent
How to Conduct a Rapid Critical Appraisal

Performing a rapid critical appraisal helps evaluate a study for its worth by ensuring validity, meaningful data, and significance to the patient. Contributors Barb Wilson, Mary Jean Austria, and Tallie Casucci share a checklist of questions to complete a rapid critical appraisal efficiently and effectively.

How To Put WellCheck Feedback to Work (For You and Your Team)

Feedback is a gift—even when it doesn’t feel like it. Senior Director of Care Navigation Stacy Silwany teams up with Organizational Development’s Michael Danielson to share how Care Navigation uses WellCheck survey data to learn from and engage employees in making the workplace better.

Understanding Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches

Quantitative and qualitative methods are the engine behind evidence-based knowledge. Tallie Casucci, Gigi Austria, and Barbara Wilson provide a basic overview of how to differentiate between the two.

How ARUP Makes it Safe for Teams to Thrive in Complexity

Why do some organizations thrive during a crisis while others flounder? Iona Thraen, director of patient safety, joined forces with her ARUP Laboratory colleagues to learn how the world-renowned national reference lab adapted to the pandemic. Leaders created a culture of safety by putting innovation, learning, and patient-centered care at the heart of all their efforts.

The Complete Clinician Model

Relationship building isn’t typically the focus of medical training but is a necessary skill for truly excellent clinicians. Deirdre, Joni, Jared and colleagues developed a model to integrate relationship management skills into medical training, helping create a more well-rounded, complete clinician.

Small Goals Can Help You Get to Great Heights

Setting goals is part of human nature, and the beginning of a new year always seems to accelerate it. Senior Value Engineer Cindy Spangler provides a framework for breaking down larger goals into smaller, more manageable steps so you’re set up for success.

How To Plan a SMART Thanksgiving

Large gatherings are out for the holidays this year. Thankfully, Senior Value Engineer and Thanksgiving enthusiast Cindy Spangler is prepared. She’s drawing from her improvement toolbox to rethink both what and how to celebrate safely this year.

How to Turn a Gut Feeling into a QI Project

Your gut tells you a process could be better than it is—how do you back that feeling up with hard data? Senior value engineer Luca Boi shows how undertaking a baseline analysis can jumpstart your improvement project.

Draw on a Wide Range of Evidence to Jump Start Your Improvement Project

Finding evidence to change the status quo isn’t easy; thinking about evidence in terms of how it persuades—whether subjective or objective—can make it easier. Plastic surgery resident Dino Maglić and his colleagues followed their guts and saved money by improving the laceration trays used to treat patients in the emergency department.

The Culture Advantage: How EVS Transformed Room Turn Time

Innovative teams solve problems by being curious, not by assigning blame. Environmental Services’ James Mwizerwa and Cooper Riley explain their deliberative approach to the long-standing and complex problem of getting inpatient rooms ready for the next patient.

Don’t Let Metrics Undermine Your Purpose

Utah’s Chief Medical Quality Officer Bob Pendleton describes a strategic challenge faced by many industries, including health care. We are at risk for prioritizing achievement of metrics over our purpose. He challenges us to think beyond metrics to what patients actually need from us: patient-centered, outcome-focused, affordable care.

How a Hospitalist Duo and a 1000-person Multidisciplinary Team Changed Practice

Changing practice is personal. It doesn’t happen through edict or mandate. Changing practice requires ongoing respectful dialogue. It requires clear vision, data-driven analysis and the support of a dedicated team. Changing practice takes longer that you think it will. In this example, we recognize the power of a partnership in this challenging and important work.

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