Quoteworthy
The spirit of generosity, already so present in health care, is especially present at U of U Health. A spirit of generosity makes us all better leaders. It is part of our culture and contagious. In an era when we are trying to stop the spread, generosity is at least something we can spread.
Dayle Benson

Most Recent
Create a Positive Learning Environment for Optimal Care

Learners, patients, and teachers are more confident and inspired when we take time to create positive learning environments. Pediatric endocrinologist Kathleen Timme gives practical advice for integrating key aspects of a positive learning environment into your daily interactions.

Active Learning: Techniques to Improve Learner Engagement

Keeping learners engaged during a talk or presentation is a challenge almost all educators have encountered. With the transition to more virtual learning over the past year, capturing learners’ attention can sometimes feel like an uphill battle. What are some tools and techniques to improve learner engagement?

Tips for New Faculty: What I Wish I Knew When I Joined the U

Being new is hard. Often for new faculty, it means adjusting to a new state, new team, new patients, and a new organizational culture. We asked hospitalists Ryan Murphy and Valerie Vaughn and surgeon Ellen Morrow for tips that only come from a little time under the belt.

The Complete Clinician Model Toolkit

Effective relationships are key to creating a safe and supportive environment for clinicians and patients alike. Use this toolkit to explore how to build and integrate relationship management skills into your daily work.

Translating Passion into Individual and System Impact

Maternal-Fetal Medicine physician Brett Einerson is passionate about reducing uncertainty for women and their families and excited to improve health care on a grander scale. Here's the important part: He knows how to do it. Learn how he translates passion into team-based action.

Listen-Sort-Empower to Improve Professional Well-being

What can we do right now to make our work environment better? Chief Wellness Officer and family medicine physician Amy Locke shares a simple team-based model for identifying opportunities, sorting what’s feasible and impactful, and empowering the frontline to lead change.

Five Ways to Practice Trauma-informed Leadership

We are surrounded by trauma—from patients, to coworkers, to our own experiences. University of Utah Health Madsen family practice leaders share how we recognize and normalize employees’ trauma experiences so they can continue to heal and provide quality care.

"We Are Surrounded By Genius" Leadership Beliefs from Rob Kistler

Beliefs are the emotional foundation for excellence and can shape organizational realities. Positive beliefs build energy, enthusiasm, caring and creativity and can increase resilience and influence bottom line results.* Rob Kistler leads nearly 1000 people as the senior director of University Hospital’s support services (nutrition care, environmental services, customer service, safety, and emergency management). Here’s what he believes about his team.

Know Your Learner: Why Teaching Adults is Different

Adults are unique learners; they come with their own experiences, preferences, and baseline knowledge. Pediatricians Kerry Whittemore and Kathleen Timme discuss adult learning theory and how physicians can approach adult learners to teach more effectively. This is part of the podcast series: M.ED: Medical Education for the Practicing Clinician by Kerry Whittemore.

Learning Experiences and Advice From a 4th-Year Medical Student

M.ED host Kerry Whittemore sits down with Garrett Christensen, a 4th-year medical student at the time of recording, to discuss the clinical years of medical training, as part of the Medical Education for the Practicing Clinician podcast series.

Four Ways Leaders Can Encourage Teams to Recover

Chief Wellness Officer Amy Locke shares practical strategies for leaders to address the real tension we’re feeling between the desire to take a break and the increasing workload.

How to Learn From Failure

Fail fast and often has been Silicon Valley’s motto for years. For medicine, where failure can result in patient harm, failure has negative connotations. Peter Weir, Utah’s executive medical director of population health and a family medicine physician, discusses different types of failures, and how we become better people and better clinicians by talking about our mistakes.