Quoteworthy
Professional growth happens with clear goals, the autonomy to reach them, and consistent feedback. Personal growth happens through discussions about work-life balance, family and recreation. Investing in the whole person positively effects engagement and retention.
Melissa Horn

Most Recent
How to Listen—Really Listen—To Feedback From Your Team

Listening to—and learning from—employees makes for a more humble and thoughtful leader. Chris Shirley, support services director, shares how he turned some stinging feedback into an opportunity to create community and inclusion.

How to Be a More Generous Leader

Generosity is a quality that leaders need now more than ever. Dayle Benson, executive director of the Medical Group and chief of staff for clinical affairs, reflects on the generous leaders in her life to help readers develop a spirit of generosity in their own leadership styles.

Recognize Your Staff at Ground Level

Effective recognition is key to engaging your team in the increasingly tough work we ask them to do. Luckily, we have an expert to guide us. HR’s senior director of employee experience, Christian Sherwood shares how you can better recognize your team – starting today.

How to Make the Shift from Doing to Leading

Our work has high stakes, and it’s natural we feel a deep sense of responsibility. Ally Tanner teaches us that trust helps lighten the load.

Build Trust By Spending Time

Every productive relationship begins with trust, and trust rests on creating positive connections with people. How do you connect with those on your team? How do you understand their concerns? U of U Health's all-star connector Alison Flynn Gaffney experiments with a new approach.

More Than One Way to Say Thanks: How the Danish Concept of Hygge Can Help in Winter and in Work

Rewarding staff might seem overwhelming amid all the responsibilities that come with being a leader. Yet, we know it has a significant effect on morale and retention. HR’s director of communication and recognition Christian Sherwood suggests a layered approach to show your appreciation that won’t necessarily hit your bottom line.

"We Are Surrounded By Genius" Leadership Beliefs from Rob Kistler

Beliefs are the emotional foundation for excellence and can shape organizational realities. Positive beliefs build energy, enthusiasm, caring and creativity and can increase resilience and influence bottom line results.* Rob Kistler leads nearly 1000 people as the senior director of University Hospital’s support services (nutrition care, environmental services, customer service, safety, and emergency management). Here’s what he believes about his team.

Is It Better To Have An MVP or A MVT (most valuable team)?

Dr. Kyle Bradford Jones is back, this time with baseball analogies. Team success means having a team of contributors instead of one MVP. Jones writes that specific factors—positivity and team identity—are critical to nurturing a successful team.

Eight Behaviors to Cultivate Trust

Employees in high-trust organizations are happier, more collaborative and stay at their jobs longer. But what builds long-term, sustaining trust? Director of strategic initiatives Chrissy Daniels highlights findings from an article in Harvard Business Review. The answer: Eight behaviors.

How Utah Builds Trust With Patient Experience

Trust. That’s what we want. We want to earn and keep the trust of every patient. We want them to trust that we provide the best possible medical care. But more than that, we want them to trust that we will respond to their needs, coordinate our efforts, and provide them with available options. We want them to trust that we will answer our phones, explain their treatment, and value their time. The exceptional patient experience is an enterprise-wide system designed to deliver a singular output: trust. And, this enterprise-wide system is built on trusting our providers and our teams.

Why I Do One of the Riskiest Surgeries in Medicine

With so few organs available for transplant, living-donor transplantation introduces improved organ quality, reduced wait times, predictable scheduling, and reduced risk of rejection. But it isn't easy—the investment and risks are huge. Robin Kim, University of Utah Transplant Division Chief, shares his commitment and the complexity of his practice.

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