Quoteworthy
You’re not a team without relationships, and people don’t feel loyal to me or trust me just because of my title. I have to build trust.
Melissa Horn

Most Recent
Tips for New Faculty: What I Wish I Knew When I Joined the U

Being new is hard. Often for new faculty, it means adjusting to a new state, new team, new patients, and a new organizational culture. We asked hospitalists Ryan Murphy and Valerie Vaughn and surgeon Ellen Morrow for tips that only come from a little time under the belt.

Coaching vs Mentoring: When and How To Get Started

When do I need a mentor and when do I need a coach? Utah Coaching Advancement Network (UCAN) co-director Tony Tsai partners with physicians Jared Henricksen, Amy Locke and Ryan Murphy to explore the benefits of professional career coaching in carving your own career path—along with the added benefit of fostering a sense of community, purpose and belonging.

The Experience That Changed My Life

Senior Nursing Director Rita Aguilar shares how a pivotal medical experience at the age of 17 sparked her interest in becoming a nurse. Years later, Rita is applying the same level of compassion and support she received from that experience to encourage others in seeking a career in health care and diversifying the medical field.

How to Master Education in the Health Professions

The new Master of Education in Health Professions degree program offers a unique opportunity to improve teaching skills, influence the future of clinical care, and increase the impact of clinical educators. The program’s interprofessional leaders, Joanne Rolls, Rebecca Wilson, and Wendy Hobson-Rohrer, share why the program is important and offer a few quick tips to improve your teaching today.

A Blueprint to Build a Successful Career in Academic Medicine

We all make lots of mistakes early on in our careers. Hospitalist and mentorship expert Valerie Vaughn sets us up for success by sharing her expertise on how to take control of your long-term career path.

Why You Need to Take a Break: The Myth and Science of Pushing Yourself

Many of us are conditioned to push ourselves even harder when times get tough. Why would anyone even consider taking a break? Research says you should. Here’s some rationale and tips to help challenge the instinct to keep pushing through.

Now More Than Ever, We Need Relational Leadership

Our moment calls for new ways of leading. Kyle Turner and Michelle Vo, relational leadership trainers, explain how this concept brings us to the task. While traditional leadership theories focus on the what and how, relational leadership asks us to place more emphasis on who.

How Clinician Educators Can Give Effective Feedback

Feedback is often an area that breaks down under the rigors and pressure of clinical activity. Clinician educators Pete Hannon and Kathleen Timme introduce a methodology that can provide insight, inspire goal setting, and help improve clinical performance.

A Nurse Mentor-Leader Model for Professional Growth

For years, nurse manager Emily Baarz has mentored millennial nurses joining Neuro Critical Care (NCC). But new nurse graduates weren’t always prepared for the high-acuity setting. So Emily created the Axon/Dendrite program, a mentor-leader model to support her staff’s professional growth.

The Elephant, The Rider, and the Path to Change in Health Care

Drawing from psychologist Jonathan Haidt’s Elephant and the Rider metaphor, Utah's Chief Medical Quality Officer Bob Pendleton explains why emotions are critical to motivating change in health care. Behavioral economics, it appears, may provide the direction we need.

Why Rounding Demonstrates Respect for Patients and Teams

Rounding–the act of connecting with patients and staff–is a leadership best practice. While few find rounding easy to start, those who master it are hooked. It is a daily habit that improves patient care, experience and engages the team. Susan Clark and her medical director, Dr. Dana DeWitt, have taken the practice one step further by rounding together as a leadership dyad, resulting in a more connected and authentic team.

Is It Better To Have An MVP or A MVT (most valuable team)?

Dr. Kyle Bradford Jones is back, this time with baseball analogies. Team success means having a team of contributors instead of one MVP. Jones writes that specific factors—positivity and team identity—are critical to nurturing a successful team.

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