Quoteworthy
Once you have engaged employees, a safe work environment, and a culture that puts patients first while valuing hard work, trust and loyalty, then your team is ready to succeed.
Jared Wrigley

Most Recent
Building a Career Progression Framework for Advanced Practice Clinicians

By the year 2032, two-thirds of the provider workforce will be advanced practice clinicians (APC). Charity Coe and Julie O’Brien, APCs and seasoned leaders passionate about improving their discipline, are charting a course for the success of future practitioners.

Create a Positive Learning Environment for Optimal Care

Learners, patients, and teachers are more confident and inspired when we take time to create positive learning environments. Pediatric endocrinologist Kathleen Timme gives practical advice for integrating key aspects of a positive learning environment into your daily interactions.

Active Learning: Techniques to Improve Learner Engagement

Keeping learners engaged during a talk or presentation is a challenge almost all educators have encountered. With the transition to more virtual learning over the past year, capturing learners’ attention can sometimes feel like an uphill battle. What are some tools and techniques to improve learner engagement?

Tips for New Faculty: What I Wish I Knew When I Joined the U

Being new is hard. Often for new faculty, it means adjusting to a new state, new team, new patients, and a new organizational culture. We asked hospitalists Ryan Murphy and Valerie Vaughn and surgeon Ellen Morrow for tips that only come from a little time under the belt.

The Complete Clinician Model Toolkit

Effective relationships are key to creating a safe and supportive environment for clinicians and patients alike. Use this toolkit to explore how to build and integrate relationship management skills into your daily work.

How to Master Education in the Health Professions

The new Master of Education in Health Professions degree program offers a unique opportunity to improve teaching skills, influence the future of clinical care, and increase the impact of clinical educators. The program’s interprofessional leaders, Joanne Rolls, Rebecca Wilson, and Wendy Hobson-Rohrer, share why the program is important and offer a few quick tips to improve your teaching today.

Know Your Learner: Why Teaching Adults is Different

Adults are unique learners; they come with their own experiences, preferences, and baseline knowledge. Pediatricians Kerry Whittemore and Kathleen Timme discuss adult learning theory and how physicians can approach adult learners to teach more effectively. This is part of the podcast series: M.ED: Medical Education for the Practicing Clinician by Kerry Whittemore.

Learning Experiences and Advice From a 4th-Year Medical Student

M.ED host Kerry Whittemore sits down with Garrett Christensen, a 4th-year medical student at the time of recording, to discuss the clinical years of medical training, as part of the Medical Education for the Practicing Clinician podcast series.

The Always Evolving Leader

Leadership is not a destination, but a journey where you’re constantly evolving and entering new stages. Dayle Benson, chief of staff of clinical affairs and executive director of the University of Utah Medical Group, shares how to practice and embrace generativity to nurture the skills of those around you and become a better leader.

How to SOLVE the Hidden Curriculum Conundrum: Student-led Reform

Medical students Rachel Tsolinas and Sam Wilkinson, along with SOM professor Kathryn Moore, share a practical tool all health care professionals can use to broaden our understanding of how culture influences decisions and events.

How to Lead Virtual Meetings

The role of the meeting leader takes on new prominence in virtual spaces like Zoom or Microsoft Teams. The Effective Communicator joins Antonius Tsai to discuss how you can make the transition from presenting content to leading and shaping a space that builds connection and purpose.

How to Teach Medical Procedures That Stick

Frequent and deliberate practice is critical to attaining procedural competency. Cheryl Yang, pediatric emergency medicine fellow, shares a framework for providing trainees with opportunities to learn, practice, and maintain procedural skills, while ensuring high standards for patient safety.